Find here key and commonly used skills-related terms and concepts with their definitions.

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Activity rate

Activity rate is the percentage of active persons in relation to the comparable total population.

The economically active population comprises employed and unemployed persons, but not the economically inactive, such as pre-school children, school children, students and pensioners.

Source: Eurostat Glossary Statistics Explained

Anticipation (skills anticipation)

Use of labour market and skills information to predict and develop policy responses to future skills needs (see Labour market information systems)

Apprenticeship

Systematic, long-term training where periods at the workplace alternate with learning in an educational institution or training centre

Apprenticeship

Systematic, long-term training where periods at the workplace alternate with learning in an educational institution or training centre

Basic skills

The skills needed to live in contemporary society, e.g. listening, speaking, reading, writing aa and mathematics (see CompetencesLiteracyNumeracy).

Brain drain

Emigration of individuals who are highly qualified or with skills set highly in demand to another country

Cedefop (2010)

The skill matching challenge: Analysing skill mismatch and policy implications

Cedefop (2010)

The skill matching challenge:

Analysing skill mismatch and policy implications.

Cedefop (2012)

Glossary:

Quality in education and training.

Cognitive skills

Skills used in the process of obtaining and understanding new knowledge through thought, reflection, experience, and the senses

Communication skills

Skills to express ideas and views clearly, confidently and concisely in speech, writing and body language (see Soft skills)

Competence

Proven ability to use knowledge, skills and personal, social and/or methodological abilities, in work or study situations and in professional and personal development (see Skill)

Competences (key competences)

The sum of skills (basic skills and new basic skills) needed to live in contemporary knowledge society. In its recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning, the European Commission sets out the eight key competences: communication in the mother tongue; communication in foreign languages; competence in maths and basic competences in science and technology; digital competence; learning to learn; social and civic competences; sense of initiative and entrepreneurship; cultural awareness and expression. For more information see http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/key_en.htm

Demand (skills demand)

Requirements for type(s) of skills, qualifications and workers in different sectors and occupations (see Supply)

Digital competences (ICT skills)

Digital competences involve confident and critical use of information society technology (ICT) in the general population and provide the necessary context (i.e. the knowledge, skills and attitudes) for working, living and learning in the knowledge society. Digital competences are defined as the ability to access digital media and ICT, to understand and critically evaluate different aspects of digital media and media contents and to communicate effectively in a variety of ICT influenced contexts.

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