Today the Commission proposed binding annual greenhouse gas emissions targets for Member States from 2021-2030. The College also held an orientation debate on China and decided to maintain its proposal for a revision of the posting of workers directive.

The College also held an orientation debate on China and decided to maintain its proposal for a revision of the posting of workers directive.

Energy Union and Climate Action

The Commission delivers on its commitment to move towards a modern and competitive low-carbon economy. The College of Commissioners adopted proposals which present binding annual greenhouse gas emissions targets for Member States from 2021-2030 for the transport, buildings, agriculture, waste, land-use and forestry sectors. The new framework is based on the principles of fairness, solidarity, cost-effectiveness and environmental integrity. All Member States are concerned, as they will be in the forefront in deciding how to implement the measures to meet the agreed 2030 target.

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Posting of Workers

The College adopted today a Communication re-examining its proposal for a revision of the Posting of Workers Directive in the context of the subsidiarity control mechanism that several national parliaments triggered in May. After careful consideration of their views, the Commission concluded that the proposal for a revision of the Directive does not constitute a breach of the subsidiarity principle. The Juncker-Commission maintains that "the posting of workers is a cross-border issue by nature and remains firmly committed to the free movement of people on the basis of rules that are clear, fair for everybody and enforced on the ground " as Commissioner Marianne Thyssen underlined.

The proposal seeks to ensure that workers carrying out work at the same location are protected by the same mandatory rules, irrespective of whether they are local workers or posted workers.  The obligation for all Member States to apply the rules in all sectors of the economy cannot be established at national level but must be laid down at Union level. The proposal furthermore fully and explicitly respects the competence of Member States to set wages in accordance with national practices.